A LOVE NOTE IN PASSING

Buzzbee Buzzcut

Buzzbee Buzzcut


From the moment she was born, everything was wrong and everything was right about Buzzbee Buzzcut.

Her mother, Yoko Oh-NO-O-O, was a Corgi chained to a stump in a neighbors backyard, left out in all kinds of weather, inclement and otherwise. On the sly, we freed Yoko of incarceration weekdays (while the owners were at work from 7 until 7) so she could accompany us in walks around the neighborhood and romps with our Schnauzer mix, Oliver, a one-time forager for Yoko that the neighbors chased out of their garbage can. Oliver led us to Yoko after we rescued him.

But on the night of January 11, 2000, the lights were bright in the neighbor’s house and the family was home, ignoring the howls of Yoko, trembling in the dark, bitter cold — pleading for mercy.

Naturally, we stole her.

We made her a bed in our garage out of a threadbare, king size, goose down comforter, arranged on an egg crate mattress near a 1500 watt, forced heat, Franklin stove heater sporting fake logs burning behind a glass window. Before retiring, we promised her we’d keep her at any cost. We left her food, water, dog biscuits, access to the outside dog run attached to the house, and a feral cat to keep her company.

The next morning she rewarded us with eight puppies.

Three of the pups hadn’t survived, but of the five that did, we found a home for Ethel after nine weeks — then cried our eyes dry and swollen for two days before deciding to keep the remaining four: Alice, Chin-Chin, Buzzbee, and Sparky.

Of the four, only Buzz was ridden with benign tumors the size of golf balls bulging out of her coat, tags hanging from every leg, perpetually leaking-crusty eyes that soon went blind, and allergies to all forms of commercial canine food, leaving her bald from the middle of her back to the tip of her tail. Her heart and ears were too big, her lungs and paws were too small, and the vet wrote her off as most likely to die before her first birthday.

But Buzz displayed a natural ability to adapt, an abundance of love, infinite devotion, and spunk. While the other puppies thrived, she endured all that plagued her with grace. She was happy, attentive, loyal and ever grateful. She never whined, cried, or barked (except at strangers walking by the house). She never growled. She never disobeyed. She never made a mistake in the house.

Counting Oliver, Yoko Oh-No-o-o, Tinkerbell (our Pekingese) and Blue 2 (our Golden Retriever), we’d grown to an eight dog household over night.

But by 2011, all except Sparky and Buzzbee had passed.

On May 1st we lost Buzz. She left us peacefully, in her sleep, at 15 years, 3 months, 19 days.

Each tear now shed is laced with immeasurable gratitude. She was a fine, fine friend that lived an exemplary life of gentle courage, providing us with purpose and genuine joy.

We bless her spirit and her soul
and ask only that we strive to always be
the best of both.

# # #

by Marguerite Quantaine © 2015

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Marguerite Quantaine is an essayist and author.

ALL ROYALTIES FROM THE SALE OF
IMOGENE’S ELOISE
GO TO THE CARE & FEEDING
OF FERALS & RESCUES

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http://www.amazon.com/Imogenes-Eloise-Inspired-true-love-story-ebook/dp/B00O6BOB2M/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1413429176&sr=1-1

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2 thoughts on “A LOVE NOTE IN PASSING

  1. antonia.althea.malvino@gmail.com

    My heart hurt so much after reading this it’s taken a few days for me to come back and comment. That sweet face is just so full of love and trust and your “theft” of her mother was an act of love and decency. I squirm just thinking about Yoko’s life, thankful someone knew the right thing to do.

    Reply
    1. margueritequantaine Post author

      Thank you, Antonia. We all know the right think to do — I’m just so very grateful we could afford to do it. Not everyone can, and I understand that. I was admonished once for not eating organic food. The woman informed me there was nothing more important than what we put into our bodies. Perhaps. But when faced with the choice, we always opt for animal welfare. We only wish we could do more.

      Reply

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